Should Columbus Day become Exploration Day?

I, for one, believe that it should. In August 2008 I was among a group of concerned folk who organized, supported and attended The Atlantic Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia featuring numerous speakers from around the world advocating taking another look at the popular teaching that Columbus discovered America. It is common knowledge that there were several explorers who journied from Europe at least hundreds of years before his 1492 venture with the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria. In fact, a new book published by St. Clair Publications primarily aimed at youth which is vividly illustrated in brilliant color unvails the story of one of them, ‘Prince Henry’ St. Clair, Earl of Orkney’ by Hazel Brown, which is available on Amazon in the US, the UK and continental European sites.

There is a growing movement to change Columbus Day to Exploration Day, recognizing all explorers for their remarkable feats. If you agree, you may go to http://explorationdayusa.org/ and sign a petition to do so.

Another wonderful book, one which I can only wish I had published, was authored by my friend, Gunner Thompson. It’s called Viking America and may be purchased in either hardback or paperback at a number os online retailers. It gives detailed research information concerning voyages to the New World as far back as the Roman Empire, and includes a shocking map which he discovered from 1414 showing another contenent on an orb resembling our modern maps, though somewhat distorted due to lack of proper charting. So the next time someone says ‘In 14 hundred and 92 Columbus sailed the ocean blue’ you can say, “Yeah, so what?”